Skip to main content.
Saturday, Jun 25, 2005

Olympus E-300 Review - DigitalCameraInfo

Jun 25, 2005 | Category: Olympus E-300

Olympus E-300While there are significant design flaws and performance issues painfully apparent on the Olympus E-300, there is still a lot to value in a sub-$900 Digital SLR. Foremost, the EVOLT E-300 is an inexpensive 8 megapixel camera with a solid build and durable casing. Additionally, Olympus has worked hard to create an impressive range of lenses and other accessories for it, and more than one manufacturer has also committed to making compatible lenses and camera bodies for the system. The E-300 also offers dust-removal technology that’s moderately effective, while its competitors don’t approach the issue in the same manor.

Performance wise, I find the E-300’s autofocus system, with only three sensor sites and limited low-light capability, the most problematic aspect of the camera. Those users who plan on shooting action – not just sports or wildlife, but anything that moves faster than a potted plant – will find this camera’s focusing an unavoidable problem. I’d recommend either the Canon Rebel XT or the Nikon D70s over the E-300 on this issue alone. The result is that most users will get sharper pictures with other models.

View Source

No Comments »

Thursday, May 26, 2005

Olympus E-300 Review - Photoxels

May 26, 2005 | Category: Olympus E-300

Olympus E-300Judging by the number of reviews of this affordable digital SLR, there is an enormous amount of interest about the Olympus EVOLT E-300. Featuring 8.0 megapixel resolution, a large 4/3 image sensor, an exclusive Supersonic Wave Filter that eliminates dust from the image sensor every time you turn on the camera, easy-to-use scene modes, and compatibility with the full line of Zuiko Digital Specific Lenses, we can see why Olympus fans get very excited with the EVOLT E-300. This is a well-designed and constructed digital SLR that provides excellent image quality, a fine degree of control with intuitive and fast operation.

View Source

No Comments »

Monday, May 23, 2005

Olympus E-300 Review - Pocket-lint

May 23, 2005 | Category: Olympus E-300

Olympus E-300The Olympus E-300 is the second, Four-Thirds D-SLR from Olympus and provides a value for money entry point into the world of the D-SLR, competing well on price in the now very competitive D-SLR market. It’s somewhat chunky design will look odd to SLR novices (its main target market, so a tad worrisome if you ask me) but comes about because of the unique porro-mirror (rather than pentamirror) viewfinder set up. The reflex mirror flips sideways directing the light-path to the right (as opposed to upwards) to the very slightly gloomy-to-use viewfinder.

View Source

No Comments »

Olympus E-300 Review - shutterbug

May 23, 2005 | Category: Olympus E-300

Olympus E-300Olympus E-300 employs a similar “Four Thirds� CCD sensor found in the E-1, but boasts much higher 8-megapixel (vs. 5-megapixel) resolution. In spite of the lower price, this is definitely not a stripped-down model. While it’s missing a few E-1 capabilities, the E-300 EVOLT is a full-featured camera with a few extras such as pop-up flash and multiple Program modes with intelligent automation.

View Source

No Comments »

Sunday, May 22, 2005

Olympus E-300 Review - ePHOTOzine

May 22, 2005 | Category: Olympus E-300

Olympus E-300On unwrapping the Olympus E-300 you will see that there is a distinct lack of the normal viewfinder prism normally associated with an SLR, but with the exception of the fairly flattish top, all the other bits you would expect are there and it definitely looks like a camera. The front of the rubberised grip has a ridge down it that sits well in the joint of the fingers whilst carrying the camera, but feels a little pronounced when using it. Another rubberised patch sits at the back of the camera for your thumb to rest on and is well placed between the controls. A selection dial sits on the top of the camera, with the on/off switch on the right side in an easily accessible place. Below, behind and partly covered by the selection dial is the single adjustment wheel that again, feels right. Auto Exposure lock and focus point selector buttons sit just below this wheel.

View Source

No Comments »

Page: 1 | 2 | 3