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Sunday, May 22, 2005

Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Review - CNET Reviews

May 22, 2005 | Category: Casio Exilim EX-Z750

Casio Exilim EX-Z750You usually have to choose between two types of digital cameras: slim-line beauties with large LCD screens or bulky enthusiast cameras capable of heavy lifting. The Casio Exilim EX-Z750 scores a coup by integrating these two schools of camera design–or rather, squeezing the benefits of the latter into the tight-fitting pants of the former. The 7.2-megapixel Z750 is the impressive spiritual successor to the handsome Exilim EX-Z55, a camera with admirable looks but disappointing image quality and a dearth of manual features. It offers the same 2.5-inch screen and trendy sub-inch-thick jeans-pocketable design as its forbearer but brings a host of new features to the table, as well as solid performance and very good image quality. Though it still lacks some of the advanced manual features found in Casio’s larger but similarly priced EX-P700, we’re willing to give it the benefit of the doubt. If you’re a photographer who craves style but also has a creative itch, the EX-Z750 is one of the few cameras we’ve seen that adequately addresses both.

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Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Review - DCRP Review

May 22, 2005 | Category: Casio Exilim EX-Z750

Casio Exilim EX-Z750The Casio Exilim EX-Z750 is a very nice 7 Megapixel ultra-compact camera with a few annoying flaws. First, the good points. The Z750 is compact, made of metal, and is well constructed. It fits easily in your pocket and can go anywhere you do. The camera has a large 2.5″ LCD display and a tiny optical viewfinder. While the screen is big, the resolution is not, and low light visibility is not very good either. Camera performance is excellent. The Z750 starts up in just one second and focusing, shutter lag, and shot-to-shot speeds are all very good. The camera’s AF-assist lamp helped it focus well in low light situations. Battery life is superb compared to most other ultra-compacts.

Image quality is very good if you tweak a few settings. The biggest problem in this area is the very oversaturated colors in nearly all of my photos. Thankfully there’s a workaround — change the saturation setting in the record menu to -1. And while I’m at it, I’d also suggest reducing the sharpness to the same number, as photos were a little too sharp for my eyes. Redeye was also a big problem, as is usually the case with ultra-compact cameras. Aside from that, the news is all good: exposure was accurate, purple fringing levels were low, and noise levels were comparable to other cameras in this class.

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Saturday, May 14, 2005

Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Review - Steve’s Digicams

May 14, 2005 | Category: Casio Exilim EX-Z750

Casio Exilim EX-Z750The Casio Exilim EX-Z750 is the top of the line Exilim model from Casio that includes many of the features found on previous models like the EX-Z57, but adds a more resolute 7-megapixel imager, handy rotating mode dial, focus-assist lamp, and brings back the optical viewfinder. This “ultra-compact” digicam is about the size of a deck of cards, and is packed with features that are usually found on larger and more expensive models. It offers a wide variety of exposure modes; the automatic Snapshot and Scene modes for the beginner and the Aperture Priority, Shutter-speed Priority and Manual modes to satisfy the more experienced photographer.

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Saturday, Apr 30, 2005

Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Review - DigitalCameraInfo

Apr 30, 2005 | Category: Casio Exilim EX-Z750

Casio Exilim EX-Z750The 7.2-megapixel Casio Exilim EX-Z750 packs a lot of power in a 0.9-inch thick compact camera body. While it isn’t as attractive as some of the other Exilim models, it has a traditional brushed aluminum body that weighs only 4.5 ounces. The battery lasts an estimated 325 shots before needing a recharge, which is quite good for a digital camera, although many portable imagers now are surpassing that. With the high megapixel count, there are plenty of resolutions available for photographers who want to print large pictures and those who want to email files. The Z750 has helpful features such as an optical viewfinder and manual focus capabilities as well as some more dynamic and exciting features, such as Past Movie and ID Photo modes. The Casio Exilim EX-Z750 has plenty of manual control options, but users may have trouble accessing them.

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Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005

Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Review

Feb 15, 2005 | Category: Casio Exilim EX-Z750

Casio Exilim EX-Z750The EX-Z750 EXILIM ZOOM for truly enjoyable digital photography

The EX-Z750’s 7.2 megapixel CCD imaging element delivers superior picture quality with remarkably high definition, while the optical 3X zoom lens and large 2.5-inch liquid crystal display assure enjoyable operation. In addition to manual operation, an extremely versatile array of shooting functions enables a variety of photo effects. Using MPEG-4 format, high quality movies can also be taken in VGA size (640 x 480 pixels) at 30 frames per second. Of course, longer battery life enables the shooting of approximately 325 shots (CIPA standards)* on a battery charge. When set in its cradle, A/V signal output allows the user to view the photos or movies taken on an external video monitor such as television.

*CIPA “Standard Procedure for Measuring Digital Still Camera Battery Consumption”:

Until recently there has been no standard measurement for battery life. This has resulted in inconsistencies between camera products and their catalogs and instruction manuals. As of December 2003, CIPA (Camera & Imaging Products Association) established the Standard Procedure for Measuring Digital Still Camera Battery Consumption, and hopes to reduce confusion among consumers by having this adopted by the world’s digital camera manufacturers and retailers.

The EX-Z750 is ideal for consumers who are looking to create superior images in challenging lighting conditions. Consumers can select aperture priority, shutter priority, or simply select from several unique “Best Shot” modes to enhance the images. The 0.9-second continuous shooting mode and low light assist, help capture sharp images such as fast action or low light scenes. The pre-record or “Past Movie” mode continuously captures 5 seconds of video automatically into buffer memory to ensure that the user records the critical video prior to pushing the shutter. Consumers can also select from several different “Movie Best Shot” modes and do simple video editing within the camera.
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