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Saturday, Aug 19, 2006

Panasonic Lumix DMC-L1 Review - Luminous Landscape

Aug 19, 2006 | Category: Panasonic Lumix DMC-L1

I’m of two minds about the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L1. Part of me really would like to like it. I’m pleased to see Panasonic entering the DSLR marketplace at around the same time as Sony with its A100. Since the camera business has very much become driven by the electronic giants, especially those that OEM sensors the way the both Sony and Panasonic do, having them each marketing a full featured DSLR is no bad thing.

In the case of Panasonic what I find very attractive is the partnering with Leica. The Leica D Vario-Elmarit 14-50mm f/2.8-3.5 that comes bundled with the L1 is almost worth the price of admission by itself, and I wouldn’t doubt that there will be Olympus owners who see it that way as well, since there’s no telling when or if Panasonic will sell this lens by itself.

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Wednesday, Aug 16, 2006

Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ3 Review - Imaging Resource

Aug 16, 2006 | Category: Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ3

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ3 is a nice little camera at a very affordable price, particularly considering that it sports a 6x, optically stabilized zoom lens. Panasonic is very justifiably proud that they’ve managed to bring optical image stabilization to their entire product line, from top to bottom.

LZ3 did quite well overall in our testing, delivering good bright color, good resolution, and only moderate lens distortion. The large 2.0-inch LCD screen is great for sharing your photos with friends, and makes the menus easier to see.

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Kodak Easyshare V610 Review - DPexpert

Aug 16, 2006 | Category: Kodak Easyshare V610

The Kodak Easyshare V610 six megapixel digital camera is “the world’s smallest 10x optical zoom digital camera” according to the company’s publicity.

It uses the dual lens setup that first appeared on the Kodak Easyshare V570. The lens in use when the camera is turned on covers the range from 38–114mm (the standard 3x zoom in film equivalent focal lengths) then, as the zoom control is moved up, the tele lens comes into effect, giving a range of 130–380mm. The switch is imperceptible.

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Nikon D80 Review - Hardware Zone

Aug 16, 2006 | Category: Nikon D80

A key selling point of the Nikon D80 is that it is able to capture at a much higher 10.2-megapixel resolution using the DX Format CCD image sensor as opposed to the Nikon D50 and Nikon D70s. More importantly, this sensor is also being used in the mid-range D200 DSLR. Besides being more energy efficient than its predecessors, the other advantage that came with the new imaging and processing package was the incorporation of color independent analog pre-conditioning with improved 12-bit digital image processing algorithms.

Another cool feature new to the D80 DSLR camera is a series of built-in photo editing parameters. If you have been using Nikon’s compact digital cameras, you will probably be familiar with the company’s renowned ‘D-Lighting’ technology. Basically, what this does is that upon exposure calculation, the camera instantly applies the overall lighting exposure over areas that are darker and less defined to mildly moderate the final exposure such that the end result would be photos that are able to reveal more depth and details. This handy function, along with a host of other useful editing features such as cropping, are available only in playback (photo preview) function however. On the bright side, users can still perform all these integrated editing functions on the large 2.5-inch TFT LCD monitor capable of displaying 230K pixels and has an ultra wide 170-degree viewing angle.

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Fujifilm FinePix F30 Review - PopPhoto

Aug 16, 2006 | Category: Fujifilm FinePix F30

Fujifilm FinePix F30 seems designed for the photographer who wants a lot of big-camera functions and performance in a small package. The Fujifilm Finepix F30 caters to this market with such functions as custom white balance, an Aperture or Shutter Priority mode, and three metering modes: Multi-segment, average, and spot. The metering modes are accessed via the obtusely titled “photometry” menu item, by the way. “Metering” works just as well, and takes up less space.

This camera has a truly usable ISO range of ISO 100 to ISO 800, and makes images at the extreme ISOs of 1600 and 3200 that can hold up to comparison with ISO 400 and 800 results from some of its competitors. The world is not made entirely of perfectly lit bright sunny days calling for ISO 100 — and Fujifilm deserves praise for pushing camera performance technology towards much more usable high ISOs in the compact market.

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